Lei Cox - Skies over FlowerField

"FlowerField has been partially inspired by computer games and mindless acts of violence. It also takes the mickey out of game based virtual realities containing key environmental messages. The work is essentially quite kitsch and deliberately over dramatic, it has a large aspect of fun." Lei Cox in Video Positive 95 Catalogue. (ed. Lisa Haskell & Lowena Faull)

At the time of its inception, FlowerField was a part of Lei Cox's Ultra Reality Series, which explored ecology and the impact of human beings on the planet. The interactive element of the original piece sarcastically criticised mankind's control over its environment. The animation was created in a blue-screen studio, using clay-mation techniques, and assembled with a Quantel Harriet - released in 1990, this allowed for the manipulation of live graphics over video. The interactivity was based on pressure pads hidden under a carpet of Astroturf that triggered different sound clips to be 'spoken' by the acrylic flowers. Skies over FlowerField, was exhibited as a new, non -interactive version, for the first time at the Electronically Yours exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Tokyo in 1998. The original animation was played from Betacam tapes; the work on view in Gallery 2 is a Quicktime, digital version played from a QuickTime file. FlowerField has been exhibited extensively since 1995, each time adapted to the specific requirements and potential of the venues.

"I have always been fascinated with the production process and never really want to end a piece but to let it exist in the studio in a live and organic form". Lei Cox


Trained in film, video and media art, Lei Cox's work comments on the effects of science and technology on individuals and contemporary culture, dealing with issues such as displacement, communication and identity in a telematic globalised society. His art has been exhibited widely as a key representative of British media art of the 90s. Lei Cox was also commissioned to produce work for Video Positive in 1991, the video and sound installation Magnification Maximus at Tate, and in 1993 The Sufferance, video installation, at The Bluecoat.

Synchronised three screen 'fresco' with sound; Video Positive 95 commission, Tate Liverpool