This summer, we're offering a range of exciting activities for young people and families, expanding our programme for anyone interested in getting involved with making and experimenting with electronics.

A partnership between FACT and the Liverpool School of Art and Design at LJMU, our creative technology hub FACTLab continues to welcome visitors of all ages to experiment and explore. Since its launch in 2015, FACTLab events and activities have welcomed over 4500 visitors, both at FACT and across the North West, and this year there's even more ways to get involved whether you're an individual interested in developing your skills, or a teacher organising an innovative workshop for your class!

By using Minecraft as an educational tool, we have a programme of workshops aimed at introducing young people to the design possibilities of the platform. Tying into this, the Minecraft Infinity Project launched at FACT as part of Liverpool Biennial 2016, invites players to collaborate with Minecrafters the world over to remake artworks exhibited at this year’s festival into the largest virtual sculpture ever made within the game. Players can get involved online, at home or in one of our Minecraft workshops, free of charge. The multiplayer map had 14, 245 visits in its first week, and you can join in at home until 24 July at fact.co.uk/minecraft.

Meanwhile, two versions of Prototype Summer School welcome children to get involved in workshops in July and August, celebrating art and science, and developing digital skills and confidence. The FACTLab edition focuses on Minecraft and experimenting with electronics and coding, taking FACT’s current exhibition by Krzysztof Wodiczko as a starting point, whilst the courses led by Digital Artist Neil Winterburn invite children to develop and share their own creative technology project. Book now - limited spaces left!

FACTLab’s Learning Technologist and Artist Radamés Ajna, says: “Prototype Summer School is all about bringing inspiration to the participants by showing that experimenting and making really is for everyone. Children with all levels of experience are welcome, and our aim is to boost the participant’s confidence and creativity, by developing skills in a fun way.”

Prototype Summer School costs £60 per child, but limited spaces are available free of charge for families of children eligible for free school meals. For more information about this or to make an enquiry, please contact jakub.jezierski@fact.co.uk

The free workshop series Hack Nights returns from 20 July at FACTLab, introducing new skills to adult participants curious about coding, hacking and tinkering. The programme is an introductory course focused on interactive and creative technologies, and particpamts should attend all sessions.

Throughout the summer, FACTLab is on an Art+Science tour across the region, using creativity as a tool for the exploration of scientific phenomena. FACTLab has made appearances at The Big Bang North West 2016, trAction Crewe, and MakeFest in Liverpool - next stop is MakeFest at Manchester Museum of Science and Industry (20 – 21 August), where FACTLab will be showcasing a brand new project combining the real and virtual worlds within Minecraft.

Dr Mark Wright is Director of FACTLab, who holds a joint appointment between FACT and Liverpool John Moore's University, says: “FACT is continuously exploring new ideas of what to offer our visitors, and how to engage people in exciting new ways. FACTLab is our way of moving from being a 'white box' that just shows art, to a place where the public is actively involved in what we do - no matter how old you are or your previous knowledge of technology.”

Find out how you can get involved at fact.co.uk/factlab!