29 July 2011

If you haven’t heard about it already, Watch Me Move is THE Animation Show and tells the story of the evolution of animation from the 1900’s shadow theatres to the visionary CGI work today. Watch Me Move takes you on a journey as you pass through cloth layers of old animations that make you smile with their lo-tech jerky movements and then you come face to face with 8 metre high projections of anime classics like Sailor Moon and Akira. The exhibition concludes with a section on visionary animation displayed in reflective white rooms. The exhibition design is absolutely amazing, well worth the trip in itself.
 

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Although there was so much to see, I have picked out a few of my exhibition highlights to share on the blog….
 

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John Lasseter/Pixar – Luxo Jr. 1986
The first film produced by Pixar and the first animated film nominated for an academy award. The short features computer-animated lamps, a big one (Luxo) and a small one (Luxo Jr.) Take a look, it’s awe inspiring that this was produced nearly 25 years ago. 

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Jan Švankmajer – Dimensions of Dialogue (Part 2: Passionate Discourse) 1982
A stop motion animation created in 1982 by the Czech surrealist artist Jan Švankmajer.. Two clay figures sat either end of a table who eventually claw each other into a pulp in an almost beautiful way. Centered on social interaction, there is also a part 1 (Exhaustive Discussion) and part 3 (Factual Conversation) which completes the piece. 


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Semiconductor – Matter in Motion 2008
Selected by the Barbican for the Visions section of the exhibition, Matter in Motion gives life to the molecular structures in the landscapes of Milan. Animated, reconstructions of the cityscape spill out of piles of dirt and fill the gaps between trees and buildings in an attempt to understand the material world around us. Matter in Motion seems to be a starting point for some of the techniques that we see developed in their current show at FACT, Worlds in the Making.

You can see an extract from Matter in Motion online here.