15 December 2010

Our next exhibition, opening on the 17 December, is a retrospective of Korean video artist Nam June Paik. 

Amongst being one of the forefathers of FACT’s main principles, video and multimedia art, he worked closely with some famous names and collaborated with well-known artists and musicians alike.

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He was part of the Fluxus movement, which was described as being ‘intermedia’ – it infiltrated many disciplines including art, music, literature, design and architecture. The word ‘Fluxus’ itself may not sound familiar, but it’s linked with some perhaps more recognisable names such as Yoko Ono, Yves Klein and John Cage.

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The movement itself was born out of Neo-Dadaism during the 1960s, which started to reverse the way art was seen during the 1960s. The artists involved wanted modern art to be taken less seriously, and used their own art to poke fun at just how seriously it was taken. The word ‘Fluxus’ is taken from Latin, meaning ‘to flow’, which reflects the way all of the different types of media were blended together. Fluxus art itself mostly materialised as events or performance art pieces, described as ‘happenings’.  The happenings were meant to blur the lines between performer and audience, and performance and reality.  Paik said of Fluxus “Art is just fraud. You just have to do something nobody else has done before".

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Fluxus art itself tended to involve found and every day objects, and was simple. It was also important to the artists that a sense of humour was prevalent in all Fluxus work. A good example of the way his Fluxus work crossed over multiple media is TV Cello, which was a collaboration with classical cellist Charlotte Moorman.  When she drew her bow across, images of her and other cellists playing would appear on the screens. Find out more about Fluxus at The Fluxus Blog.  

Follow this link to find more information about the Nam June Paik exhibition. 


TV Cello, 2003

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© Nam June Paik Estate