6 September 2010

Last week, our summer exhibition Persistence of Vision drew to a close.  It explored the relationships between vision, memory and media in a world of modern technology and the Internet.  We can capture our memories and store them in ways that were never available to us in the past, and Persistence of Vision asked how this affects our personal memories. 

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We lost ourselves in AVPD’s seemingly endless mirror mazes, and found ourselves magnified as part of a surreal chain of reflections in Mizuki Watanabe’s In-Between Gaze.   Mysteriously encased in a blue star shaped purpose built structure, Lindsey Seers’ film It has to be this way drew on personal experience of memory loss, and got us thinking about the way cinema and photography shapes our memories.


Lindsay Seers, It has to be this way in Gallery 1 at FACT
 

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There was plenty to interact with during Persistence of Vision.  Our Media Lounge housed the exciting Exploratory Laboratory, a series of mind-bending games created specially for the exhibition in collaboration with the University of Liverpool. Sascha Pohflepp’s Fixr slowly grew and took over our Atrium as visitors donated memories and stories they wish they’d had been able to photograph.


A visitor testing her memory skills in The Exploratory Laboratory



 Some of the memories that hung in our atrium
 

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We put some brilliant films back on the big screen as part of the exhibition, such as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Awakenings, and a special showing of Terence Davies’ Distant Voices, Still Lives accompanied by a question and answer session exploring the way childhood traumas shape our memories, with neuroscientist Daniel Glaser and Davies’ collaborator Don Boyd.  

We were also delighted that our Gay Sunday event - a screening of Marcus Lindeen's documentary Regretters - was part of the first Liverpool Pride weekend. The live Skype link-up with the director proved to be a great success too, it felt like Marcus was in the room with us!
 

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We had some great feedback from our visitors:

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“The Exploratory Laboratory was fun, I will continue the games at home.  The mirrors were very good, very clever!”

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“I found the interaction very engaging and the theme of memory is close to home.  Very interesting, educational and engaging.”

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“Best exhibition ever had at FACT ever. Wife agreed!"

It's not over yet! 

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If you want to learn more about Persistence of Vision, you can buy Vision, Memory and Media, the book inspired by the exhibition from the FACT shop or online.

The exhibition will be opening in Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center, Denmark on 20 November 2010. 

Curated by Karen Newman (FACT) and Andreas Brøgger (Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center, Denmark).

Exhibition delivered in partnership with Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center, Denmark and supported by EU Japan Fest Japan Committee

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Next up is the 2010 Liverpool Biennial Festival of Contemporary Art, which will be taking over the whole of Liverpool from 18 September.  This year’s theme is Touched, and FACT’s artists will be exploring the idea of a mother’s touch, loss and separation.  Keep reading the blog for spotlights on each of the Biennial artists that will be showing at FACT!

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Kaarina Kaikkonen

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Tehching Hsieh 

 

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