7 September 2010

South Korean artist Minouk Lim will be showing at FACT during Liverpool Biennial, approaching fast on 18 September.  Minouk’s work is mostly video based and with a strong performance element, presenting contentious theories on the act of art itself; and what art means when it is removed from the places it is usually found.  She plays around with how art is viewed outside of its usual museums and galleries.

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Her first work was a street installation called Bus Stops, which challenged the idea that the modern media have produced a set visual environment in which art is viewed, and that this shapes the way art is understood and absorbed.  She explores the notion of spectators and onlookers, and challenges her audience to feel awakened and influenced by art rather than just passively absorbing it.

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 Minouk’s work reflects the stark leap Korea has taken to modernise itself, as seen in Do We Negotiate Her Destiny, in which she traces the changes the city of Ganggyeong went through from prosperity, to decline, and finally under threat from reckless privatisation and real estate development.  In New Town Ghost Minouk wrote a long text which she asked a young Korean slam poet to perform through a megaphone with a drummer, as they are driven around the neighbourhood the text is written about.  She politically engages with the changes around her city which she views as “selling out”, such as the new shopping mall with attached apartment complex.


New Town Ghost (2005)
Video installation 10minutes 19seconds
Image courtesy of the artist
 

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Her FACT exhibit, The Weight of Hands, is set in her home city of South Korea.  Under the narrative of a road trip, she challenges Korea’s changing social attitudes, particularly towards surveillance. She uses heat sensitive cameras to track the journey of a strange tourist group in a restricted place.  She cleverly subverts and almost pokes fun at the authorities by using their own technology to illustrate and criticise the way the Korean public authorities restrict access to anybody whom resists the recent tourism led developments.    


The Weight of Hands (2010)
Image courtesy of the artist 

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Click here to find out more about Minouk Lim